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Article
Students’ Race and Participation in Classroom Discussion in Introductory Sociology: A Preliminary Investigation
Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
  • Jay R. Howard, Butler University
  • Aimee Zoeller
  • Yale Pratt
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Abstract
This study utilizes observation, survey and interview methodologies to investigate the impact of student race on participation in discussion in introductory sociology courses at a large Midwestern US university with a minority enrollment of approximately 15 percent. While results are mixed there is some evidence that white students participated at a higher rate than minority students. However, in certain circumstances (e.g., discussion of racism), minority students became the “experts” during particular class sessions and participated at a greater rate than did white students. Key Words: Discussion, College Students, Race, Learning, Interaction
Rights

“Copyright 2006-2015 by The Trustees of Indiana University. Reproduced with permission from the Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL).”

Citation Information
Howard, Jay R., Aimee Zoeller, and Yale Pratt. 2006. “Students’ Race and Participation in Classroom Discussion in Introductory Sociology: A Preliminary Investigation.” Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Vol. 6, No. 1:14-38. Available from: digitalcommons.butler.edu/facsch_papers/585/