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Contribution to Book
Considering the Potential Importance of Western Montane Habitats During Autumn Landbird Migration
Migration Stopover Ecology of Western Avian Populations: A Southwestern Migration Workshop (2004)
  • Jay D. Carlisle, Boise State University
Abstract
The topographic and climatic gradients of western ecosystems make for a unique laboratory in which to investigate stopover ecology. In particular, the late summer heat and aridity across much of the Intermountain West and Great Basin may have important ramifications shaping migration and molt strategies of western migrants. To date, most investigations of migration in the West have focused on riparian systems, which are clearly critical to migrants and deserving of conservation measures. However, the extent to which autumn migrants utilize non-riparian habitats has received little attention, and if we limit our focus to lowland riparian areas we may miss other important migration stopover habitats. Data from a number of western states suggest that montane habitats might serve an important role for many landbird migrants during the late summer molt period and autumn migration, a time period when many lowland areas of the west, including some riparian systems, are extremely arid (Austin, 1970; Greenberg and others, 1974; Blake, 1984; Hutto, 1985).
Publication Date
2004
Editor
Susan K. Skagen, Cynthia P. Melcher, and Rob Hazlewood
Publisher
U. S. Geological Survey, Biological Resources Discipline, Open File Report
Citation Information
Jay D. Carlisle. "Considering the Potential Importance of Western Montane Habitats During Autumn Landbird Migration" Migration Stopover Ecology of Western Avian Populations: A Southwestern Migration Workshop. Ed. Susan K. Skagen, Cynthia P. Melcher, and Rob Hazlewood. U. S. Geological Survey, Biological Resources Discipline, Open-File Report 2004-1452. 10-11.