Skip to main content
Article
Testing potentiates new learning across a retention interval and a lag: A strategy change perspective
Journal of Memory and Language
  • Jason C.K. Chan, Iowa State University
  • Krista D. Manley, Iowa State University
  • Sara D. Davis, Iowa State University
  • Karl K. Szpunar, University of Illinois at Chicago
Document Type
Article
Publication Version
Accepted Manuscript
Publication Date
10-1-2018
DOI
10.1016/j.jml.2018.05.007
Abstract

Practicing retrieval on previously studied materials can potentiate subsequent learning of new materials. In four experiments, we investigated the influence of retention interval and lag on this test-potentiated new learning (TPNL) effect. Participants studied four word lists and either practiced retrieval, restudied, or completed math problems following Lists 1–3. Memory performance on List 4 provided an estimate of new learning. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were tested on List 4 after either a 1 min or 25 min retention interval. In Experiments 3 and 4, participants took at 25 min break before studying List 4. A TPNL effect was observed in all experiments. To gain insight into the mechanism that may underlie TPNL, we analyzed the extent to which participants organized their recall from list to list. Relative to restudy and math, testing led to superior semantic organization across lists. Our results support a strategy change account of TPNL.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Chan, Jason CK, Krista D. Manley, Sara D. Davis, and Karl K. Szpunar. "Testing potentiates new learning across a retention interval and a lag: A strategy change perspective." Journal of Memory and Language 102 (2018): 83-96. DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2018.05.007. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Copyright Owner
Elsevier Inc.
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Jason C.K. Chan, Krista D. Manley, Sara D. Davis and Karl K. Szpunar. "Testing potentiates new learning across a retention interval and a lag: A strategy change perspective" Journal of Memory and Language Vol. 102 (2018) p. 83 - 96
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jason_chan/27/