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Article
Parental Presence at the Bedside of Critically Ill Children in a Unit With Unrestricted Visitation.
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
  • Jennifer R Foster, Western University
  • Farhana I AlOthmani
  • Jamie A Seabrook, Western University
  • Tariq AlOfisan
  • Yasser M AlGarni
  • Amrita Sarpal, Western University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
8-1-2018
URL with Digital Object Identifier
https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001617
Disciplines
Abstract

Objectives

To determine the percentage of time that critically ill children have a parent at the bedside and to identify extrinsic factors that are associated with percent of time with parental presence at the bedside.

Design

Prospective cohort study.

Setting

PICU in a single tertiary care children's hospital.

Subjects

Primary two parents of all children admitted to the PICU on 12 preselected days during a 1-year period from 2014 to 2015.

Interventions

None.

Measurement and Main Results

A total of 111 observations of 108 unique PICU admissions and families were performed. Children had at least one parent present a mean of 58.2% (SD, 34.6%) of the time. Mothers spent more time at the bedside (56.3% [SD, 31.0%]) than fathers (37.3% [SD, 29.5%]) (p = 0.0001). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was positively correlated with age (rs = 0.23; p = 0.02) and negatively associated with Pediatric Risk of Mortality III score (rs = -0.26; p = 0.01). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was lower for children who were mechanically ventilated (42.8% [SD, 35.5%]) than not (64.5% [SD, 32.2%]) (p = 0.01) and whose parent(s) were single (45.5% [SD, 27.5%]) or cohabitating/common-law (35.7% [SD, 26.4%]) compared with parents who were married (64.2% [SD, 34.2%]) or separated/divorced (68.3% [SD, 28.8%]) (p = 0.02). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was higher for children with chronic illnesses (63.4% [SD, 32.9%] vs 50.1% [SD, 35.8%] without; p = 0.04), when there was a bed in the patient room (61.4% [SD, 34.0%] vs 32.5% [SD, 28.3%] without; p = 0.01), and when parents slept in the patient room (90.3% [SD, 11.2%]) compared with their own home (37.6% [SD, 34.4%]) (p < 0.0001). Percent of time with parental presence at the bedside was not correlated with day of PICU stay, number of siblings, previous PICU admission, isolation status, or nursing ratio.

Conclusions

Children had a parent present at the bedside approximately 60% of the time. The parents of younger, sicker children may benefit from supportive interventions during PICU admission. Further research is needed to examine both extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting parental presence at the bedside.

Notes

Article available at Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001617

Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies.

Citation Information
Jennifer R Foster, Farhana I AlOthmani, Jamie A Seabrook, Tariq AlOfisan, et al.. "Parental Presence at the Bedside of Critically Ill Children in a Unit With Unrestricted Visitation." Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Vol. 19 Iss. 8 (2018) p. 387 - 387
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jamie-seabrook/19/