Skip to main content
Article
Response of Self-thinning to Artificially Reduced Levels of Leaf Area in Monocultures of Trifolium pratense
Annals of Botany (1985)
  • James N. Long, Utah State University
  • T J Dean
Abstract
Greenhouse grown monocultures of Trifolium pratense L, were partially defoliated to test the hypothesis that the constant of proportionality (K) in the self-thinning rule is a function of leaf area. This constant equates mean weight (w) and density (p) in self-thinning populations by the equation

Pruning leaflets did not affect the pattern or occurrence of density-related mortality but, as predicted, did affect K, which was reduced by 25 per cent as leaf area was decreased from an average of 7.3 to 3.9 m2m−2. For both self-thinning and non-self-thinning populations, leaf area was substituted for K in eqn (1) to give

Multiple linear regression showed that this expression was significant for all three defoliation treatments. Regressions with tree data grouped by genera were also significant and indicate that eqn (2) may be a more general expression of the relation between mean weight and density in even-aged monocultures. The self-thinning rule may be a special case of eqn (2) which expresses itself when leaf area attains some upper limit.
Keywords
  • Trifolium pratense,
  • red clover,
  • leaf area,
  • self-thinning,
  • defoliation
Disciplines
Publication Date
1985
Citation Information
James N. Long and T J Dean. "Response of Self-thinning to Artificially Reduced Levels of Leaf Area in Monocultures of Trifolium pratense" Annals of Botany Vol. 55 Iss. 3 (1985) p. 361 - 366
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jameslong/189/