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Temporal and spatial dynamics of boreal forest structure in western Newfoundland: silvicultural implications for marten habitat management
Forest Ecology and Management (1996)
  • James N. Long, Utah State University
  • Brian R. Sturtevant
  • John A Bissonette, Utah State University
Abstract
The conservation of marten (Martes americana) populations within managed forests will require planning at appropriately large temporal and spatial scales. A conceptual model of stand-level dynamics is constructed from empirical study of forests in western Newfoundland and related to the habitat requirements of resident marten. The model suggests that the critical elements of marten foraging habitat are currently found within a senescent forest stand structure. Implications of the model are discussed as they relate to landscape-level disturbance patterns. Changes in both stand-level dynamics and landscape-level phenomena indicate that intensive silviculture is necessary to promote marten habitat within managed forests in Newfoundland. We propose a density management regime designed to provide a marten habitat window within a reasonable pulpwood rotation period. The stand-level prescriptions are intended as a tool to be incorporated into an overall landscape management regime.
Keywords
  • boreal forest,
  • habitat management,
  • stand density management diagram
Publication Date
1996
DOI
doi:10.1016/S0378-1127(96)03837-6
Citation Information
James N. Long, Brian R. Sturtevant and John A Bissonette. "Temporal and spatial dynamics of boreal forest structure in western Newfoundland: silvicultural implications for marten habitat management" Forest Ecology and Management Vol. 87 Iss. 1-3 (1996) p. 13 - 25
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jameslong/177/