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Article
The Effect of Teaching Methods on Examination Performance and Attitudes in an Introductory Financial Accounting Course
Journal of Education for Business
  • Joseph Marcheggiani
  • Karel A. Updyke, Butler University
  • James F. Sander, Butler University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
4-1-1999
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08832329909601685
Abstract
This article describes a study in which a group-Socratic teaching method and an interactive lecture style were compared for their effect on students' examination performance in an introductory financial accounting course. The effect of teaching method on students' attitudes toward the accounting profession and the course was also analyzed. An ANOVA design was used to test for differences between experimental and control groups of undergraduate students. The results provide no evidence that either method of instruction results in significantly higher scores on examinations; nor was there any statistically significant difference in attitudes toward the accounting profession or the course.
Rights

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Education for Business on March 31, 2010, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08832329909601685.

Notes
Definitive version as appeared in journal available from Routledge.
Citation Information
Joseph Marcheggiani, Karel A. Updyke and James F. Sander. "The Effect of Teaching Methods on Examination Performance and Attitudes in an Introductory Financial Accounting Course" Journal of Education for Business Vol. 74 Iss. 4 (1999) p. 203 - 210
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/james_sander/1/