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Article
The Butterfly Effect: Conservation Easements, Climate Change, and Invasive Species
Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review (2011)
  • James L. Olmsted
Abstract
This Article explains that one of the consequences of climate change will be migrations of species from their native habitats to newer habitats, typically to the north, with climates similar to those in which such species evolved. These in-migrating species will in many cases be invasive, forcing the native species to out-migrate or be driven to extinction, thereby causing biodiversity loss. As many of these disrupted ecosystems may be protected by perpetual conservation easements, the Article discusses the negative legal consequences of incursions by non-native species on these existing conservation easements. Accordingly, the Article suggests a number of changes that can be made to future conservation easements to help insure their protection of land in perpetuity and to better protect species and their habitats from the effects of climate change-caused migrations.
Keywords
  • conservation easements,
  • climate change,
  • invasive species
Disciplines
Publication Date
2011
Citation Information
James L. Olmsted, "The Butterfly Effect: Conservation Easements, Climate Change, and Invasive Species," Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review 38.1 (2011): 41-76.