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Article
Protecting California's Coastal Communities: Four Models of Public Interest Lawyering
Environs: UC Davis Environmental Law and Policy Journal (2007)
  • James Mize, UCLA
Abstract
Californian fishing communities contribute greatly to the state’s economy, but changes in demands upon marine resources, pollution impacts, and conflicting values for the management of fish and its habitat threaten the viability of the fishing communities’ way of life. Law can help to preserve the lore of fishing communities and protect them from disappearing from California’s culture. When protecting interests of disadvantaged coastal communities, organizations face a choice of how to balance protection of the marine resources relied upon by the communities and the people’s right to use those resources. Possible legal tactics include litigation to affect how managing agencies treat coastal communities, efforts to influence legislation (both locally and nationally), community organizing and advocacy efforts to support these approaches, or direct legal services to assist the members of these communities. This paper considers several organizations as illustrative of different approaches to public interest lawyering, and evaluates their respective effectiveness.
Disciplines
Publication Date
Spring 2007
Citation Information
James Mize. "Protecting California's Coastal Communities: Four Models of Public Interest Lawyering" Environs: UC Davis Environmental Law and Policy Journal Vol. 30 Iss. 2 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/james_mize/4/