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Presentation
Burrowing Owls, Common Ravens, and Power Transmission Lines in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, Idaho
Idaho Conference on Undergraduate Research
  • Aidan Branney, Humboldt State University
  • Maitreyi Sur, Boise State University
  • Sharon Poessel, U.S. Geological Survey
  • Todd E. Katzner, U.S. Geological Survey
  • James R. Belthoff, (Mentor), Boise State University
Abstract
Common Ravens (Corvus corax), generalist predators capable of behavioral innovation, present a threat to many species of conservation concern (Coates et al. 2014). Increases in raven abundance in western habitats have been associated with anthropogenic changes. Belthoff and colleagues (unpubl. data) working in Idaho noted that ravens visited more than 60% of Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) nests monitored with trail cameras. Ravens regularly kleptoparasitized nests and preyed on nestlings. Burrowing Owls are of conservation concern in many western states, therefore understanding burrowing owl population decline is essential. We examined the patterns of co-occurrence of Common Ravens and Burrowing Owls in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in Idaho through a series of surveys. Our poster describes factors most associated with raven-owl interactions and will be useful for pre- and post-construction comparisons of relationships between ravens and Burrowing Owls in areas being developed for energy.
Comments
Poster #W15
Citation Information
Aidan Branney, Maitreyi Sur, Sharon Poessel, Todd E. Katzner, et al.. "Burrowing Owls, Common Ravens, and Power Transmission Lines in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, Idaho"
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/james_belthoff/51/