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Contribution to Book
Shared child rearing in nuclear, fragile, and kinship family systems: Evolution, dilemmas, and promise of a coparenting framework.
Faculty Publications
  • James P. McHale
SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

James P. McHale

Document Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
2010
Date Issued
January 2010
Date Available
March 2012
Disciplines
Abstract
Excerpt: “This chapter examines the vital but overlooked importance of coparenting coordination and collaboration for families and in children’s lives…three main sections in this chapter…why coparenting and marital systems in the family are not the same…major research findings form studies of coparenting in nuclear families—and, where available, in fragile families in which parents are not married as well as in extended kinship systems…how a coparenting framework might be enlisted to guide program and policy efforts…” (p. 77)
Comments
Excerpt only. Published in M.S. Schulz, M. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, R.D. Parke, M.S. Schulz, M. Pruett, …R. D. Parke (Eds.), Strengthening couple relationships for optimal child development: Lessons from research and intervention (pp.77-94). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. doi: 10.1037/12058-006. For full access, check out the book through the USF St. Petersburg Library (HQ503.S77 2010), request it on interlibrary loan, or order it through a book dealer. Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.
Language
en_US
Publisher
American Psychological Association
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Citation Information
McHale, J. P. (2010). Shared child rearing in nuclear, fragile, and kinship family systems: Evolution, dilemmas, and promise of a coparenting framework. In M.S. Schulz, M. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, R.D. Parke, M.S. Schulz, M. Pruett, …R. D. Parke (Eds.), Strengthening couple relationships for optimal child development: Lessons from research and intervention (pp.77-94). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. doi: 10.1037/12058-006.