Skip to main content
Article
Experimental sleep fragmentation and sleep deprivation in rats increases exploration in an open field test of anxiety while increasing plasma corticosterone levels
Behav Brain Res
  • Jaime L. Tartar, Nova Southeastern University
  • C.P. Ward
  • J.W. Cordeira
  • S.L. Legare
  • A.J. Blanchette
  • R.W. McCarley
  • R.E. Strecker
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Disciplines
Peer Reviewed
1
Abstract
Sleep deprivation alters mood and anxiety in man. In rats, 24 h of treadmill-induced total sleep deprivation or sleep fragmentation increased exploratory behavior in an open field test of anxiety compared to cage or exercise controls. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels of sleep disturbed and exercise control rats were elevated compared to cage controls, suggesting that the increased exploration observed in the sleep disturbed rats was not due to a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress response.
DOI
10.1016/j.bbr.2008.08.035
Citation Information
Jaime L. Tartar, C.P. Ward, J.W. Cordeira, S.L. Legare, et al.. "Experimental sleep fragmentation and sleep deprivation in rats increases exploration in an open field test of anxiety while increasing plasma corticosterone levels" Behav Brain Res Vol. 197 Iss. 2 (2009) p. 450 - 453 ISSN: 0166-4328
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jaime-tartar/37/