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Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder projectstar
Journal of Hospital Infection (2010)
  • Jacqui Reilly, Glasgow Caledonian University
  • S. Stewart
  • P. Christie
  • G. Allardice
  • A. Smith
  • R. Masterton
  • I. M. Gould
  • C. Williams
Abstract

Following recommendations from a Health Technology Assessment (HTA), a prospective cohort study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening of all admissions (N = 29 690) to six acute hospitals in three regions in Scotland indicated that 7.5% of patients were colonised on admission to hospital. Factors associated with colonisation included re-admission, specialty of admission (highest in nephrology, care of the elderly, dermatology and vascular surgery), increasing age, and the source of admission (care home or other hospital). Three percent of all those who were identified as colonised developed hospital-associated MRSA infection, compared with only 0.1% of those not colonised. Specialties with a high rate of colonisation on admission also had higher rates of MRSA infection. Very few patients refused screening (11 patients, 0.03%) or had treatment deferred (14 patients, 0.05%).

Keywords
  • MRSA,
  • hospital infection,
  • epidemiology,
  • infection control
Disciplines
Publication Date
January 1, 2010
Publisher Statement

Originally published in: Journal of Hospital Infection (2010), 74 (1), pp.35-41.

Citation Information
Jacqui Reilly, S. Stewart, P. Christie, G. Allardice, et al.. "Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: interim results from the NHS Scotland pathfinder projectstar" Journal of Hospital Infection Vol. 74 Iss. 1 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jacqui_reilly/7/