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Article
The Role of Stably Committed and Uncommitted Cells in Establishing Tissues of the Somite
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • Mindy George-Weinstein, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Jacquelyn Gerhart, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Michele Mattiacci-Paessler
  • Eileen Simak
  • Jennifer Blitz
  • Rebecca Reed
  • Karen Knudsen
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
4-15-1998
Abstract
Somites are blocks of embryonic mesoderm tissue that give rise to skeletal muscle, cartilage, and other connective tissues. The development of different tissues within the somite is influenced by adjacent structures, in particular, the neural tube and notochord. Results of experiments performed in vivo and in vitro suggest that somites contain populations of cells stably programmed to undergo either skeletal myogenesis or chondrogenesis and a population uncommitted to either pathway. The fate of the uncommitted cells would depend on a transfer of information from the committed cells. Communication between committed and uncommitted cells is regulated by cell and tissue interactions that either activate or inhibit this process.
PubMed ID
9599289
Comments

This article was published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Volume 842, Pages 16-27.

The published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1998.tb09627.x .

Copyright © 1998.

Citation Information
Mindy George-Weinstein, Jacquelyn Gerhart, Michele Mattiacci-Paessler, Eileen Simak, et al.. "The Role of Stably Committed and Uncommitted Cells in Establishing Tissues of the Somite" Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Vol. 842 (1998) p. 16 - 27
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jacquelyn-gerhart/28/