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Physiologic Responses, Liking and Motivation for Playing the Same Video Game on an Active Versus a Traditional, Non-Active Gaming System.
International Journal of Exercise Science
  • Gabriel J Sanders, Kent State University, Kent OH
  • Antonia S Santo, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Corey A Peacock, Kent State University, Kent OH
  • Kyle-Patrick von Carlowitz, Kent State University, Kent OH
  • Megan L. Williamson, Kent State University
  • Jacob E. Barkley, Kent State University, Kent OH
Abstract
Int J Exerc Sci 5(2) : 160-169, 2012. Evidence suggests that individuals playing certain video games on the Nintendo Wii® (Wii) exhibit increased energy expenditure versus traditional video games, although little research examines non-Wii Sports/Fit games. The purpose of this study is to assess physiologic responses, liking, and the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of a popular, non-Wii sports video game for the Wii relative to the same game played on a traditional, non-active system. Twenty-four college-aged students participated. Heart rate and oxygen consumption (O2) was assessed during rest and when playing the following games: Madden NFL 2011® for Playstation 2 (PS2 Madden) and the Wii (Wii Madden), and Wii Sports Boxing. The RRV was assessed for Wii Madden versus PS2 Madden. Analysis of variance demonstrated a main effect for condition (p ≤ 0.01) as O2 (5.2 ± 0.2 ml·kg-1·min-1 Wii, 4.1 ± 0.1 ml·kg-1·min-1 PS2, 3.7 ± 0.1 ml·kg-1·min-1, rest) and heart rate (89.2 ± 2.7 bpm Wii, 79.7 ± 2.5 bpm PS2, 79.1 ± 2.5 bpm, rest) was greater for Wii Madden than PS2 Madden and rest. Heart Rate (105.4 ± 5.3 bpm) and O2 (10.4 ml·kg-1·min-1) for Wii Sports Boxing was significantly greater than all other conditions (p ≤ 0.003). The RRV was not significantly different between Wii Madden and PS2 Madden (p = 0.50). Compared to the same game on a traditional system, Wii Madden is more physiologically challenging and equally reinforcing. However, Wii Madden would not be categorized as moderate-intensity physical activity.
Citation Information
Gabriel J Sanders, Antonia S Santo, Corey A Peacock, Kyle-Patrick von Carlowitz, et al.. "Physiologic Responses, Liking and Motivation for Playing the Same Video Game on an Active Versus a Traditional, Non-Active Gaming System."
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jacob_barkley/1/