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A Window for Change: Conflicting Ideologies and Legal Reforms in Late Nineteenth-Century Oregon
Willamette Law Review (2001)
  • Inara K Scott
Abstract
The passage of the Oregon Donation Land Act, the first federal land grant legislation to allow women a right to claim free land, is not widely regarded as a turning point in the history of the struggle to gain legal rights for women. The legislative history indicates that, far from being a triumph of feminist lobbying, the Act was passed primarily to attract women to the far west and was not intended to radically alter their social or legal status. In Oregon, there were few indications of any sort of local movement on behalf of women's property rights. However, the implication of the Act for Oregon was that a substantial number of married women came to hold a sizable estate in land. Oregon, unlike the eastern states where few women had land claims except for inheritance, would have to adjust legally and socially to the impact of a new class of landowners.
Keywords
  • Oregon,
  • women's studies
Publication Date
2001
Citation Information
Inara K Scott. "A Window for Change: Conflicting Ideologies and Legal Reforms in Late Nineteenth-Century Oregon" Willamette Law Review Vol. 37 (2001)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/inara_scott/2/