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Social Movement Unionism and Social Partnership in Germany: The Case of Hamburg’s Hospitals
Articles and Chapters
  • Ian Greer, Cornell University
Publication Date
1-1-2008
Abstract

This paper traces the emergence of social movement unionism in Hamburg, Germany, as labor’s channels of influence have broken down and economic pressures have intensified. Trade unionists have responded to the privatization of the municipal hospitals by mobilizing members and building coalitions around issues beyond their members’ immediate interests, including democracy and public service quality. Although the loss of union influence has facilitated social movement unionism, in East Germany economic crisis has had a demobilizing effect.

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Required Publisher Statement
© Wiley. Final version published as: Greer, I. (2008). Social movement unionism and social partnership in Germany: The case of Hamburg’s hospitals. Industrial Relations, 47(4), 602-624.
DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-232X.2008.00537.x
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Greer, I. (2008). Social movement unionism and social partnership in Germany: The case of Hamburg’s hospitals[Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/971

Citation Information
Ian Greer. "Social Movement Unionism and Social Partnership in Germany: The Case of Hamburg’s Hospitals" (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ian_greer/18/