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Socioeconomic Differentials among Single-race and Multi-race Japanese Americans
Ethnic and Racial Studies (2011)
  • Isao Takei, Nihon University
  • Arthur Sakamoto, University of Texas at Austin
  • Hyeyoung Woo, Portland State University
Abstract

Using data from the 2000 US Census, this study investigates various groups of single-race and multi-race Japanese Americans in terms of their schooling and wages. The results indicate that all categories of Japanese Americans tend to have higher schooling than whites. Single-race Japanese Americans tend to have higher schooling than multi-race Japanese Americans, and 1.5-generation Japanese Americans tend to have higher schooling than native-born Japanese Americans. With the exception of foreign-educated, immigrant Japanese Americans, most of the wage differentials are explained by schooling and a few other demographic characteristics. These results are rather inconsistent with traditional assimilation theory which posits rising socioeconomic attainments with increasing acculturation. Instead, the findings suggest a reverse pattern by which the groups that are more closely related to Japan tend to have higher levels of educational attainment which then become translated into higher wages.

Keywords
  • Japanese Americans -- Social conditions,
  • Japanese Americans -- Ethnic identity,
  • Racial identity,
  • Racially mixed people -- Social conditions,
  • Japanese Americans -- Education
Disciplines
Publication Date
2011
Citation Information
Isao Takei, Arthur Sakamoto and Hyeyoung Woo. "Socioeconomic Differentials among Single-race and Multi-race Japanese Americans" Ethnic and Racial Studies Vol. 34 Iss. 9 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/hyeyoung_woo/20/