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Article
A Culturally Adapted Smoking Cessation Intervention for Korean Americans: A Mediating Effect of Perceived Family Norm Toward Quitting
Quantitative Health Sciences Publications and Presentations
  • Sun S. Kim, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Seong-Ho Kim, Korean Bible University
  • Hua (Julia) Fang, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Simona Kwon, New York University
  • Donna Shelley, New York University
  • Douglas M. Ziedonis, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Publication Date
5-31-2014
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Korean men and women have the highest current smoking rates across all Asian ethnic subgroups in the United States. This is a 2-arm randomized controlled study of a culturally adapted smoking cessation intervention. The experimental condition received eight weekly 40-min individualized counseling sessions that incorporated Korean-specific cultural elements, whereas the control condition received eight weekly 10-min individualized counseling sessions that were not culturally adapted. All participants also received nicotine patches for 8 weeks. One-hundred nine Korean immigrants (91 men and 18 women) participated in the study. The rate of biochemically verified 12-month prolonged abstinence was significantly higher for the experimental condition than the control condition (38.2 vs. 11.1 %, χ (2) = 10.7, p < 0.01). Perceived family norm significantly mediated the effect of cessation intervention on abstinence. Smoking cessation intervention for Korean Americans should be culturally adapted and involve family members to produce a long-term treatment effect.
Keywords
  • Smoking cessation,
  • Cultural adaptation,
  • Perceived social norm,
  • Mediation analysis,
  • Korean Americans
DOI of Published Version
10.1007/s10903-014-0045-4

Source
Kim SS, Kim SH, Fang H, Kwon S, Shelley D, Ziedonis D. A Culturally Adapted Smoking Cessation Intervention for Korean Americans: A Mediating Effect of Perceived Family Norm Toward Quitting. J Immigr Minor Health. 2014 May 31. [Epub ahead of print] doi:10.1007/s10903-014-0045-4
PubMed ID
24878686
Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
Citation Information
Sun S. Kim, Seong-Ho Kim, Hua (Julia) Fang, Simona Kwon, et al.. "A Culturally Adapted Smoking Cessation Intervention for Korean Americans: A Mediating Effect of Perceived Family Norm Toward Quitting" (2014) ISSN: 1557-1920
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/hua_fang/28/