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Contribution to Book
Agents of Diversity and Social Justice: Librarians and Scholarly Communication
Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Policy and Infrastructure
  • Harrison W. Inefuku, Iowa State University
  • Charlotte Roh, University of San Francisco
Document Type
Book Chapter
Publication Version
Published Version
Publication Date
1-1-2016
Abstract

Scholarly communication is central to the academic endeavor. For researchers, publishing is the vehicle through which they contribute new knowledge to the scholarly record. For faculty members, their record of scholarship is a measure of their efficacy as researchers and their scholarly impact. The ability of faculty to participate in scholarly communication and add to the scholarly canon is central to the development and continuation of their careers. The importance of publishing is reflected in the tenure and promotion process. A 2006 survey by the Modern Language Association found that “demands placed on candidates for tenure, especially demands for publication, have been expanding in kind and increasing in quantity”, demonstrating that the cliché “publish or perish” is more true than ever. Unfortunately, the current scholarly communication environment in both academia and publishing includes barriers that limit the diversity of authors and topics represented in the published literature.

Comments

This book chapter is from Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Policy and Infrastructure, ed. Kevin L. Smith and Katherine A. Dickson (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).

Copyright Owner
Kevin L. Smith
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Harrison W. Inefuku and Charlotte Roh. "Agents of Diversity and Social Justice: Librarians and Scholarly Communication" Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Policy and Infrastructure (2016) p. 107 - 127
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/hinefuku/51/