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Article
Acute lithium administration selectively lowers tyrosine levels in serum and brain.
Brain Research
  • Hewlet McFarlane, Kenyon College
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2011
Abstract
Lithium exerts anti-dopaminergic behavioral effects. We examined whether some of these might be mediated by changes in brain levels of tyrosine (TYR), the precursor to dopamine. Lithium chloride (LiCl(2)) 3.0mEq/kg IP acutely lowered serum TYR and the ratio of serum TYR to other large neutral amino acids (LNAAs); it also selectively lowered striatum TYR levels as measured in tissue or in vivo. While LiCl(2) 3.0mEq/kg IP also augmented haloperidol (0.19mg/kg SC)-induced catalepsy, this lithium effect was not attenuated by administration of TYR 100mg/kg IP. We conclude that lithium acutely and selectively lowers brain TYR by lowering serum levels of tyrosine relative to the LNAAs that compete with it for transport across the blood-brain barrier. However, the lowering of TYR does not appear to significantly contribute to the ability of lithium to potentiate haloperidol-mediated catalepsy.
Citation Information
McFarlane, H.G., *Steele, J.W., *Vinion, K., Bongiovanni, R., and Jaskiw, G.E (2011). Acute lithium administration selectively lowers tyrosine levels in serum and brain. Brain Research, Vol. 1420, pp. 29-36.