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PUBLIC CONTROL OF LAND USE: ARE EXISTING ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES APPROPRIATE?
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW (1977)
  • Herman L. Boschken
Abstract
In the post-WWII period, a transformation of urban processes occurred which raises questions about the appropriateness of "territorial" government. This change manifested in activities and problems that transcend and defy identity by spatial propinquity or physical boundedness. As such, a significant mismatch occurs between territorial and political boundaries, raising questions of representation and administrative legitimacy. Those patterns of governance based on the territorial model -- both local government and centralized area-wide bureaucracy -- are ill-equipped to handle the variety of unique decisions and diverse constituencies surrounding most major land use control situations. Instead, the trans-territorial complexity of metropolitan settlement raises the possibility of a new perspective which views land use control through an open system of concurrent government. This non-hierarchical system operates through an intergovernmental coordination of interest and knowledge specific agencies.
Keywords
  • land use control,
  • intergovernmental cordination,
  • concurrent government,
  • metropolitan governance,
  • trans-territorial complexity
Publication Date
September, 1977
Citation Information
Herman L. Boschken. "PUBLIC CONTROL OF LAND USE: ARE EXISTING ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES APPROPRIATE?" PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW Vol. 37 Iss. 5 (1977) p. 495 - 504
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/herman_boschken/16/