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Article
Influence of Teaching Self-Regulation on Academic Achievement of At-Risk Students
The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum
  • Heather Williams, Boise State University
  • Carl F. Siebert, Boise State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2018
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.18848/2327-7963/CGP/v25i01/1-13
Abstract

This study investigates the potential influence of a twelve-week “self-leadership” class on math and reading achievement for 136 at-risk students attending a northwestern alternative high school. This class included key features in self-regulated learning, including the use of metacognitive, motivational, and/or behavioral strategies. We hypothesized that the capacity to self-regulate would be related to improved test scores because at-risk students who have increased abilities to lead themselves are better able to reduce risk-taking behavior, self-regulate their learning, and utilize skills related to metacognition to improve their academic achievement. Our study followed a quasi-experimental design that used two sets of math and reading scores in two cases and one comparison group to examine changes in math and reading scores. Test-score analysis revealed an improvement only in math scores for those attending leadership classes when controlling for students’ GPA. Implications suggest the importance of further research.

Citation Information
Heather Williams and Carl F. Siebert. "Influence of Teaching Self-Regulation on Academic Achievement of At-Risk Students" The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum (2018)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/heather_williams/9/