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Article
Striking a Balance among Security, Privacy and Competition. The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 (DRIP)
Diritto Mercato Tecnologia (2015)
  • Guido Noto La Diega, Queen Mary University of London
Abstract

Following the ECJ decision that declared the Data Retention Directive invalid, the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 (DRIP) has been enacted. It is not indisputable whether the DRIP gives more powers to the intelligence services at the detriment of both citizens’ privacy and freedom of enterprise or whether it simply clarifies the nature and extent of obligations that can be imposed on telecommunications service providers based outside the UK under Part 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA). The article provides news also on Data Retention Regulations 2014, R (David Davis MP and Tom Watson MP) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and the proposed Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, making some final comment on the balance among security, privacy and competition.

Keywords
  • privacy,
  • security,
  • competition,
  • DRIP,
  • DRIPA,
  • RIPA,
  • data retention,
  • data retention directive,
  • european court of justice,
  • C-293/12,
  • Digital Rights Ireland,
  • C-594/12,
  • Seitlinger,
  • investigatory powers,
  • data retention and investigatory powers,
  • terrorism,
  • balance,
  • human rights,
  • telecommunications
Publication Date
2015
Publisher Statement
For educational and research purposes only
Citation Information
Guido Noto La Diega. "Striking a Balance among Security, Privacy and Competition. The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 (DRIP)" Diritto Mercato Tecnologia (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/guidonotoladiega/7/