Skip to main content
Article
Male dating violence victimization and adjustment: The moderating role of coping
American Journal of Men's Health (2012)
  • R. C. Shorey
  • J. Febres
  • H. Brasfield
  • Gregory Lyal Stuart
Abstract
Dating violence is a prevalent problem. Research demonstrates that males and females are victimized at comparable rates in their dating relationships and experience a number of mental health and relationship problems. Less research has examined male dating violence victimization, its association to mental health and relationship satisfaction, and whether coping styles influence mental health symptoms and relationship satisfaction among victims. The current study examined physical and psychological aggression victimization, adjustment (posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and relationship satisfaction), and problem-focused and emotion-focused coping among heterosexual college males in a current dating relationship (n = 184). Results identified that psychological victimization was associated with posttraumatic stress and relationship discord above and beyond physical victimization. Interaction findings identified that psychological victimization was associated with increased posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms at high levels of problem-focused coping, whereas psychological victimization was associated with less relationship satisfaction at low levels of emotion-focused coping. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed. doi: 10.1177/1557988311429194
Keywords
  • dating violence,
  • posttraumatic stress,
  • relationship satisfaction,
  • coping
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
R. C. Shorey, J. Febres, H. Brasfield and Gregory Lyal Stuart. "Male dating violence victimization and adjustment: The moderating role of coping" American Journal of Men's Health Vol. 6 Iss. 3 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_stuart/94/