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Article
The association between intimate partner violence perpetration, victimization, and mental health among women arrested for domestic violence
Partner Abuse (2012)
  • R. C. Shorey
  • J. Elmquist
  • A. Ninnemann
  • H. Brasfield
  • J. Febres
  • E. F. Rothman
  • Y. C. Schonbrun
  • J. R. Temple
  • Gregory Lyal Stuart
Abstract
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major problem. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of research on the associations between IPV perpetration, victimization, and mental health among women. This study examined these associations among a sample of women arrested for domestic violence and court-referred to batterer intervention programs (BIPs; N = 88). Using selfreport screening instruments for Axis I and Axis II mental health problems, results showed very high rates of mental health problems among women. In addition, both IPV perpetration and victimization were associated with increased mental health symptoms. Women who met diagnostic cutoff scores reported greater IPV perpetration/victimization than women who did not meet those cutoff scores. Implications of these findings for future research and IPV interventions are discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1946-6560.3.1.3
Keywords
  • DOMESTIC VIOLENCE,
  • MENTAL HEALTH,
  • PARTNER VIOLENCE,
  • BATTERERS
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
R. C. Shorey, J. Elmquist, A. Ninnemann, H. Brasfield, et al.. "The association between intimate partner violence perpetration, victimization, and mental health among women arrested for domestic violence" Partner Abuse Vol. 3 Iss. 1 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_stuart/92/