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Article
Predicting the use of aggressive conflict tactics in a sample of women arrested for domestic violence
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships (2007)
  • F. M. Hughes
  • Gregory Lyal Stuart
  • K. C. Gordon
  • T. M. Moore
Abstract
This study explored factors that might place women at risk for utilizing physical aggression in their relationships. Women (N = 103) court-referred to violence intervention programs completed measures of family of origin violence, relationship aggression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and borderline personality features. Relationship aggression was correlated with reports of parent-to-child violence in the family of origin, borderline personality features, and the partner's use of violence. Regression analyses indicated that, controlling for partners' aggression, PTSD symptoms were negatively associated with physical aggression, and borderline features were positively associated with physical aggression. The relationship between family of origin violence and the use of physically aggressive conflict tactics was mediated by borderline features. Study limitations and implications for future research are discussed. doi: 10.1177/0265407507075406
Keywords
  • arrested women,
  • borderline personality symptoms,
  • family of origin violence,
  • intimate partner violence,
  • posttraumatic stress symptoms,
  • relationship aggression
Publication Date
April, 2007
Citation Information
F. M. Hughes, Gregory Lyal Stuart, K. C. Gordon and T. M. Moore. "Predicting the use of aggressive conflict tactics in a sample of women arrested for domestic violence" Journal of Social and Personal Relationships Vol. 24 Iss. 2 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_stuart/70/