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An Examination of Early Maladaptive Schemas among Substance Use Treatment Seekers and their Parents
Contemporary Family Therapy (2012)
  • Ryan C. Shore
  • Scott Anderson
  • Gregory Lyal Stuart, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Abstract
Early maladaptive schemas, which are cognitive and behavioral patterns of viewing oneself and the world that result in substantial distress, are gradually being documented as important vulnerabilities for substance abuse. Unfortunately, there is limited research on early maladaptive schemas among substance abusers and their family members. Research on this topic may carry important implications for family-focused substance use interventions. The current study examined similarities and differences in early maladaptive schemas among a sample of substance abuse treatment seeking adults (n = 47) and at least one parent (n = 58). Results demonstrated that the substance abusers scored higher than their parents on 17 of 18 early maladaptive schemas, with most differences falling into the large effect size range. There were some similarities in the specific early maladaptive schemas endorsed by both groups despite substance abusers scoring higher on all schemas. Implications of these findings for future research and family-focused substance use treatment programs are discussed. DOI: 10.1007/s10591-012-9203-9
Publication Date
September, 2012
Citation Information
Ryan C. Shore, Scott Anderson and Gregory Lyal Stuart. "An Examination of Early Maladaptive Schemas among Substance Use Treatment Seekers and their Parents" Contemporary Family Therapy Vol. 34 Iss. 3 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_stuart/10/