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About Gregory Lyal Stuart

Dr. Stuart’s program of research has a particular emphasis on the role of substance use and abuse in intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization. His work addresses a broad spectrum of factors that are relevant to the etiology, classification, assessment, prevention, maintenance, and treatment of intimate partner violence. His research has shown that intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization are overrepresented in populations of individuals in treatment for substance abuse, and that substance abuse is overrepresented in men and women court mandated to attend batterer intervention programs. His work has also shown that the probability of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization is higher on substance use days relative to days of no substance use. His work examines the impact of substance abuse treatment on the prevalence and frequency of intimate partner violence and psychological aggression, as well as the effects of substance abuse treatment on other domains of relationship and family functioning. Dr. Stuart’s work also examines whether including substance use treatments in batterer intervention programs improves outcomes for men and women arrested for domestic violence. Dr. Stuart is interested in conducting treatment outcome research in general, and specifically for family violence and substance misuse. As examples, his laboratory is currently conducting studies of batterer intervention program outcomes for people arrested for domestic violence, as well as the effects of innovative addiction treatments in substance abuse patients. His lab has several studies that examine genetic predictors of intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and treatment outcome. His work focuses on family violence throughout the lifespan, including child abuse, dating aggression, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse and mistreatment.

Positions

Present Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
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Honors and Awards

  • Chancellor's Award in Research and Creative Achievement, University of Tennessee-Knoxville (2013)
  • College of Arts and Sciences Senior Research/Creative Achievement Award, University of Tennessee-Knoxville (2012-13)
  • National Center of Excellence in Women's Health Outstanding Faculty Mentoring Award, Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital (2007)
  • Outstanding Teaching Award in Psychology, Brown University (2007)


Articles (70)