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Presentation
College Musicians' Self-Efficacy to Maintain Practice Schedules in Adverse Situations
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (2013)
  • D. Gregory Springer, University of Kentucky
  • Joanne P. Rojas, University of Kentucky
Abstract

Musicians need more than just the desire to succeed at maintaining a disciplined practice schedule; they must also have the self-regulatory skills to motivate themselves. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a scale that measures musicians’ self-efficacy to maintain practice schedules during adverse situations. Participants (N = 175) were sampled from the student membership of the College Music Society. Analysis of the psychometric properties of the scale provided evidence for validity and reliability. Rasch modeling indicated future versions of the scale should revise three ill-fitting items and could reduce the number of response options. Internal factors (e.g., “when I am feeling sick”) were the greatest cause of lack of self-efficacy. Performance majors were statistically significantly more likely to have higher self-efficacy than non-performance majors. Multiple regression analysis indicated that days per week and hours per week practiced were significant predictors of self-efficacy.

Disciplines
Publication Date
April 28, 2013
Citation Information
D. Gregory Springer and Joanne P. Rojas. "College Musicians' Self-Efficacy to Maintain Practice Schedules in Adverse Situations" Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_springer/7/