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Article
Beliefs of Applied Studio Faculty on Desirable Traits of Prospective Music Education Majors: A Pilot Study
Journal of Music Teacher Education
  • Natalie Steele Royston, Iowa State University
  • D. Gregory Springer, Boise State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
10-1-2015
Disciplines
Abstract
The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the beliefs of applied music faculty on desirable traits of prospective music education majors. Researcher-designed surveys were sent electronically to applied music faculty at 12 National Association of Schools of Music–accredited institutions randomly selected from each of the four major divisions of the United States. Data from returned surveys were analyzed to describe the admissions process for music majors at each institution, in addition to respondents’ perceptions of the desirability of various professional dispositions and selection criteria for entering music education majors. Results suggest that music education faculty hold limited responsibility in the admissions process at the majority of respondents’ institutions and that admissions decisions are primarily determined by applied music faculty. In addition, respondents reported that certain professional dispositions and selection criteria were more important than others in admitting prospective music education majors. Implications for music teacher educators are discussed.
Citation Information
Natalie Steele Royston and D. Gregory Springer. "Beliefs of Applied Studio Faculty on Desirable Traits of Prospective Music Education Majors: A Pilot Study" Journal of Music Teacher Education (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_springer/18/