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Presentation
Preservice Music Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Popular Music in the Music Classroom
Symposium on Music Teacher Education (2013)
  • D. Gregory Springer, Boise State University
  • Lori F. Gooding, University of Kentucky
Abstract

The use of popular music in the classroom has long been a source of controversy. Supporters of popular music in the classroom cite many reasons, such as popular music as students’ preferred style (Boyle, Hosterman, & Ramsey, 1981; Finnäs, 1989; Leblanc, 1979) and the enhancement of aural musicianship through popular music study (Green, 2002; Woody, 2007). Conversely, opponents cite reasons like the perceived aesthetic inferiority of popular music to other genres and the risk of fostering defiant behavior (Fowler, 1970), among others. Despite these opposing attitudes, the use of informal learning practices, commonly found in popular music study, also offer benefits to students in formal music settings (Allsup, 2003; Green, 2002; Woody, 2007).

The purpose of this study was to examine preservice music teachers’ attitudes toward popular music in the music classroom and their preparation to teach popular music. Research questions investigated participants’ ratings of (1) the perceived effectiveness of popular music as an instructional tool, (2) the perceived appropriateness of popular music in various age groups and classroom settings, (3) attitude toward popular music in the classroom, and (4) preparation to teach popular music.

Disciplines
Publication Date
September 28, 2013
Citation Information
D. Gregory Springer and Lori F. Gooding. "Preservice Music Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Popular Music in the Music Classroom" Symposium on Music Teacher Education (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gregory_springer/12/