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Article
Explaining Attitudes toward Binational Cooperation among Municipal Managers in the U.S.-Mexico Border Area
Public Performance & Management Review
  • John P. Truman, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Grant W. Neeley, University of Dayton
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
9-1-2003
Abstract
This study examines Texas municipal managers' attitudes toward the benefits of binational cooperation. It tests theories suggesting attitudes are influenced by perceived language, cultural, and resource barriers; differences in U.S. and Mexican public administration; interdependence of policy priorities; and contact with international organizations. Project data are drawn from a mail survey sent to department heads in all municipal governments in Texas border counties. Effects of independent variables are estimated using an ordered logistic regression model. Results indicate more frequent contact between municipal managers in Texas and Mexico has a positive effect on attitudes toward the benefits of cooperation, whereas perceived communication barriers have a negative effect. Language and cultural barriers, contact with the North American Development Bank, and ethnic origins of managers are shown to have little explanatory value. Policy makers interested in improving cross-border cooperation should focus on reducing communication barriers and facilitating meetings between U.S. and Mexican managers.
Inclusive pages
88-97
ISBN/ISSN
1530-9576
Publisher
American Society for Public Administration
Peer Reviewed
Yes
Citation Information
John P. Truman and Grant W. Neeley. "Explaining Attitudes toward Binational Cooperation among Municipal Managers in the U.S.-Mexico Border Area" Public Performance & Management Review Vol. 27 Iss. 1 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/grant_neeley/19/