Skip to main content
Presentation
Effectiveness of Student Facilitation in Motivational Interviewing Education
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Annual Meeting
  • Juanita A. Draime, Cedarville University
  • Rebecca M. Widder, Cedarville University
  • Ginger D. Cameron, Cedarville University
  • Aleda M.H. Chen, Cedarville University
  • Mark D. Pinkerton, Cedarville University
  • Douglas C. Anderson, Cedarville University
Document Type
Poster Session
Location
National Harbor, MD
Event Date
7-1-2015
Keywords
  • Pharmacy students,
  • motivational interviewing,
  • pharmaceutical education
Abstract

Objectives: To determine the impact of student or faculty facilitation on student (1)self-assessed attitudes, confidence, and competence in motivational interviewing (MI) skills, (2)actual competence, and (3)evaluation of facilitator performance. Method: Pharmacy students are often utilized in educational settings to facilitate or assist with courses, but little is known how this impacts outcomes. Four third-year pharmacy students underwent a two-day MI training course as well as small group facilitation training. After IRB approval, second-year pharmacy (P2) students in a Cardiology Module were randomly assigned to a student- or faculty-facilitator for practicing MI skills in small groups over 4 hours. Then, P2s participated in a simulated patient encounter where they had to utilize MI and assessed with the MITI (modified). P2s completed a pre-post, 6-point, Likert-type survey assessing their attitudes and perceived competence (4 and 12 items, agreement), confidence (18 items), and facilitator performance (12 items, post-test only, quality). Differences between student and faculty facilitators were assessed using a Mann-Whitney-U test. Results: Of the 44 P2s (100% response rate), there were no significant differences in (1) attitudes, confidence, or competence, (2)actual competence, and (3)evaluations of facilitator performance between faculty- and student-facilitated groups post-experience (p>0.05). Implications: The use of upper-level pharmacy students as small group facilitators did not impact student perceived and actual performance; they were viewed as equally favorable as faculty members. By using pharmacy students as facilitators, it can lessen faculty workload and provide an outlet for students to develop communication and facilitation skills that will be needed in future practice.

Citation Information
Juanita A. Draime, Rebecca M. Widder, Ginger D. Cameron, Aleda M.H. Chen, et al.. "Effectiveness of Student Facilitation in Motivational Interviewing Education" American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Annual Meeting (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ginger_cameron/68/