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Bittersweet Harvest: the Smithsonian's Bracero Exhibit at Mexican Heritage Plaza
San Francisco Bay Area Independent Media Center (Indybay) (2010)
  • Gil J. Villagran, San Jose State University
Abstract
A U.S.-Mexico treaty in the midst of World War II to bring Mexican men to work in U.S. farms and railroads created the Bracero Program. All braceros were voluntary workers, eager for any job at any wage as the U.S. Stock Market-caused economic Depression of the 1930s affected Mexico almost as much as it did the U.S., since so much of Mexican industry was U.S. owned or controlled. Ironically, only a few years earlier more than one million Mexican immigrants had been deported by the same U.S. government, now eager for Mexican “arms” (brazos), hence the common term for these now eagerly welcomed “guest workers” to ensure the war-fighting capacity on the home front.
Disciplines
Publication Date
March 11, 2010
Citation Information
Gil J. Villagran. "Bittersweet Harvest: the Smithsonian's Bracero Exhibit at Mexican Heritage Plaza" San Francisco Bay Area Independent Media Center (Indybay) (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gil_villagran/7/