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Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44: Lessons learned from a model whole-cell bioreporter with a broad application history
Sensors (2012)
  • Josef Trögl
  • Archana Chauhan
  • Steven Ripp
  • Alice C. Layton
  • Gabriela Kuncová
  • Gary S. Sayler, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Abstract
Initially described in 1990, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 served as the first whole-cell bioreporter genetically endowed with a bioluminescent (luxCDABE) phenotype directly linked to a catabolic (naphthalene degradative) pathway. HK44 was the first genetically engineered microorganism to be released in the field to monitor bioremediation potential. Subsequent to that release, strain HK44 had been introduced into other solids (soils, sands), liquid (water, wastewater), and volatile environments. In these matrices, it has functioned as one of the best characterized chemically-responsive environmental bioreporters and as a model organism for understanding bacterial colonization and transport, cell immobilization strategies, and the kinetics of cellular bioluminescent emission. This review summarizes the characteristics of P. fluorescens HK44 and the extensive range of its applications with special focus on the monitoring of bioremediation processes and biosensing of environmental pollution. doi:10.3390/s120201544
Disciplines
Publication Date
February, 2012
Citation Information
Josef Trögl, Archana Chauhan, Steven Ripp, Alice C. Layton, et al.. "Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44: Lessons learned from a model whole-cell bioreporter with a broad application history" Sensors Vol. 12 Iss. 2 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gary_sayler/35/