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Article
Accounting for immigrant nonimmigrant differences in reading and mathematics in twenty countries
Ethnic and Racial Studies (2005)
  • Gary Marks, ACER
Abstract

Both national and international studies of education often show that the performance of immigrant students is substantially lower than that of non-immigrant students. This article investigates the contribution of socio-economic, sociocultural and school factors to the relative performance of first- and second-generation immigrant students in twenty countries using data from the OECD's 2000 Program for International Student Assessment. In most countries, socio-economic factors substantially account for the weaker performance of immigrant students, whereas sociocultural factors contribute little and school factors are important in only a limited number of instances. Altogether, these factors account for the bulk of the difference in achievement between immigrant and non-immigrant students in almost all the countries examined.

Publication Date
September, 2005
Citation Information
Gary Marks. "Accounting for immigrant nonimmigrant differences in reading and mathematics in twenty countries" Ethnic and Racial Studies Vol. 28 Iss. 5 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gary_marks/39/