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Changing Labor Market Conditions and Economic Development in Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, China
Articles and Chapters
  • Gary S Fields, Cornell University
Publication Date
1-1-1994
Abstract
In the newly industrializing economies (NIEs) of Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan (China), the entire working population has benefited from labor market institutions. The East Asian NIEs attained and maintained generally full employment, improved their job mixes, raised real earnings, and lowered their rates of poverty. This article reaches two principal conclusions. First, labor market conditions continued to improve in all four economies in the 1980s at rates remarkably similar to their rates of aggregate economic growth. Second, labor market repression was not a major factor in the growth experiences of these economies in the 1980s. It thus appears that labor market repression is neither necessary nor desirable for outward-oriented economic development.
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Required Publisher Statement
© Oxford University Press. Final version published as: Fields, G. S. (1994). Changing labor market conditions and economic development in Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, China. World Bank Economic Review, 8(3), 395-414). doi: 10.1093/wber/8.3.395 Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Fields, G. S. (1994). Changing labor market conditions and economic development in Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, China[Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/980

Citation Information
Gary S Fields. "Changing Labor Market Conditions and Economic Development in Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, China" (1994)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gary_fields/135/