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Article
The imprint of China’s first emperor on the distant realm of eastern Shandong
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2010)
  • Gary M. Feinman, Field Museum of Natural History
  • Linda M. Nicholas
  • Hui Fang
Abstract

Imperial expansion is recurrent in human history. For early empires, such as in ancient China, this process generally is known from texts that glorify and present the perspective of victors. The legacy of the Qin king, Shihuangdi, who first unified China in 221 BC, remains vital, but we have few details about the consequences of his distant conquests or how they changed the path of local histories. We integrate documentary accounts with the findings of a systematic regional survey of archaeological sites to provide a holistic context for this imperialistic episode and the changes that followed in coastal Shandong.

Keywords
  • archaeological survey | full-coverage settlement patterns,
  • Langyatai,
  • Qin and Han Empires,
  • Shihuangdi
Publication Date
2010
Citation Information
Gary M. Feinman, Linda M. Nicholas and Hui Fang. "The imprint of China’s first emperor on the distant realm of eastern Shandong" Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Vol. 107 Iss. 11 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gary_feinman/4/