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Article
Collective Efficacy: A Community Level Health Promotion and Prevention Strategy
Forum on Public Policy Online: A Journal of the Oxford Roundtable (2007)
  • Gail Gerding, East Tennessee State University
Abstract
Hispanic-Americans are almost twice as likely to die from diabetes, than Caucasians. In an effort to improve health outcomes of Hispanic Appalachians, faculty researchers from East Tennessee State University (ETSU) and representatives from the Hispanic community came together in 2003 to form La Coalicion Hispano-Americano de la Salud (CHAS). Using CDC funds, the members of CHAS and ETSU faculty engaged in community-based participatory research (CBPR) focused on diabetes prevention. The team implemented thirteen health screenings and informational sessions serving approximately 400 people. Increased utilization of a local clinic resulted in a 30% increase in Hispanic diabetic patients. CHAS members were included in at least 3 advisory health boards throughout the city. Continued collaboration as a community resulted in other types of health promotion and prevention activities. These findings indicated that CBPR is an effective mechanism for strengthening community capacity for change. Collective efficacy is the linkage of mutual trust and a shared willingness to intervene for the good of the community. By increasing the ability of the community to work together to address health issues, collective efficacy becomes a significant community level intervention.
Publication Date
Summer 2007
Citation Information
Gail Gerding. "Collective Efficacy: A Community Level Health Promotion and Prevention Strategy" Forum on Public Policy Online: A Journal of the Oxford Roundtable (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gail_gerding/3/