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The WTO's Blind Spot: Dispute Resolution in the International Food Industry
Mayhew-Hite Report - Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution (2013)
  • Gabriela Steier
Abstract

This paper analyzes the importance of the WTO’s role and its dispute resolution process within the international food trade system based on a discussion of the WTO’s dispute resolution of American genetically modified (GM) crops that were forced into the European market. In order for public policy and economic aspects to coexist in the legally binding decisions that originate from the WTO dispute resolution process, the panels should acknowledge their protective function toward the trading partners on the one hand, and the public and the global ecologic sustainability on the other. The resulting precedent, in turn, would induce behavioral changes in all WTO signatory nations, and, if legally enforced, promote economics, public health, and environmental protection simultaneously. Thus, the WTO needs to construe already available laws, such as the Cartagena Protocol, in a way as to not only protect public health, biodiversity, sustainable agriculture, and fair trade, but also those companies that currently manipulate the WTO and govern the food industry.

Keywords
  • WTO,
  • dispute resolution,
  • food trade,
  • GM foods,
  • EU trade barriers
Disciplines
Publication Date
Spring April, 2013
Citation Information
Gabriela Steier. "The WTO's Blind Spot: Dispute Resolution in the International Food Industry" Mayhew-Hite Report - Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution Vol. 11 Iss. 4 (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/gabriela_steier/27/