Skip to main content
Article
Communicating H1N1 risk to university students: a regional cross-sectional survey-study
Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (2012)
  • Francisco Soto Mas
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess university students’ self-reported knowledge, behavior, and behavioral intention regarding H1N1 influenza. Participants included students at a major university in the southwestern US. Data were collected in early spring 2010 through a 24-item selfadministered survey. Outcome variables included knowledge, behavior and intention. A total of 483 students participated. Most reported trying to prevent H1N1 influenza though specific behaviors. Many lacked knowledge about symptoms and treatment; a few (10%) had been vaccinated; and half had no intention of getting vaccinated or practicing self-isolation. Gender and age were significantly associated with the three outcome variables. Intention was the most significant contributor to behavior [t (1) = 3.34, p<.001]. H1N1 influenza campaigns directed toward university students in the US should focus on undergraduate, male students, and revise their strategies regarding vaccination and self-isolation.

Keywords
  • H1N1 pandemic,
  • college students,
  • knowledge,
  • behavior,
  • intention
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
Francisco Soto Mas. "Communicating H1N1 risk to university students: a regional cross-sectional survey-study" Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Vol. 9 Iss. 1 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fsotomas/20/