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Article
Smokers and Beer Drinkers: An Examination of Values and Consumer Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence
Journal of Consumer Marketing (1999)
  • Fredric Kropp, Monterey Institute of International Studies
  • Anne M. Lavack, University of Winnipeg
  • Stephen J.S. Holden, Bond University
Abstract

A study examines the personal values of college-age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to non-smokers, smokers are less likely to place importance on the values of security, being well respected, and having a sense of belonging. When compared to non-beer drinkers, college students who are beer drinkers are more likely to place importance on the value of excitement, and are less likely to place importance on the value of security. Smokers are less susceptible to interpersonal influence than non-smokers, but there are no differences in susceptibility to interpersonal influence between beer drinkers and non-beer drinkers. Values and susceptibility to interpersonal influence can play a useful role as descriptors, and possibly as predictors, of drinking and smoking behavior.

Publication Date
1999
Citation Information
Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and Stephen J.S. Holden. "Smokers and Beer Drinkers: An Examination of Values and Consumer Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence" Journal of Consumer Marketing Vol. 16 Iss. 6 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fredric_kropp/13/