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Article
Effects of Communication, Information Overlap, and Behavioral Consistency on Consensus In Social Perception.
Faculty Publications
  • Thomas E Malloy, Rhode Island College
  • Fredric Agatstein, Rhode Island College
  • Aaron Yarlas, University of California - Los Angeles
  • Linda Albright, Westfield State College
Document Type
Article
Department (Manual Entry)
Dept. of Psychology
Date of Original Version
8-1-1997
Abstract

Three experiments (N = 69, 162, and 201, respectively) were conducted to test the mathematically derived predictions of the Weighted Average Model (D. A. Kenny, 1991) of consensus in interpersonal perception. Study 1 estimated the effect of perceiver communication, Study 2 estimated the effects of communication and stimulus overlap, and Study 3 estimated the effects of communication, overlap, and target consistency on consensus. The strongest consensus was found when perceivers communicated about highly overlapping information about targets who were cross-situationally consistent. Conversely, the lowest level of consensus was observed when perceivers did not communicate and had non-overlapping information about targets who were cross-situationally inconsistent. Both stimulus variables (overlap and consistency) and an interpersonal variable (communication) affected consensus as predicted by the Weighted Average Model. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR].

Citation Information
Thomas E Malloy, Fredric Agatstein, Aaron Yarlas and Linda Albright. "Effects of Communication, Information Overlap, and Behavioral Consistency on Consensus In Social Perception." (1997)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fredric_agatstein/2/