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Article
African American High School Males’ Perceptions of Academically Rigorous Programs, Identity, and Spirituality
National Journal of Urban Education & Practice (2009)
  • Sharon Michael-Chadwell, University of Phoenix
  • Fred A Bonner, II, Texas A & M University - College Station
  • Dave A Louis, Texas A & M University - College Station
Abstract

This study explored the perceptions of African American high school males regarding their experiences in academically rigorous programs. A specific investigation as to how this cohort defined giftedness or academic success is underscored along with their perceptions of factors they identified as hindrances to their academic success subsequent to their graduation from high school. The study also focuses on the implications for this cohort participating in gifted programming, given the intensity of these academic engagements. In many instances, spirituality and religiosity are two enduring and salient aspects of African American culture that have in many ways influenced identity development; these constructs have also been used as methods of coping and overcoming perceived injustices (Billingsley, 2003). Hence, how these African American males’ perceived the role of spirituality in their daily lives, particularly their schooling experiences, was also examined.

Keywords
  • Black,
  • African-American,
  • Males
Publication Date
January 1, 2009
Citation Information
Sharon Michael-Chadwell, Fred A Bonner and Dave A Louis. "African American High School Males’ Perceptions of Academically Rigorous Programs, Identity, and Spirituality" National Journal of Urban Education & Practice Vol. 3 Iss. 1 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fred_bonner/4/