Skip to main content
Article
Technical Note—Artificial Inoculation of Decay Fungi into Douglas-Fir with Rifle or Shotgun to Produce Wildlife Trees in Western Oregon
Western Journal of Applied Forestry (2004)
  • Fred A. Baker, Utah State University
  • Gregory M. Filip
  • Catherine G. Parks
  • Stephen E. Daniels
Abstract
A total of 188 Douglas-fir trees were treated to determine whether fungal inoculation with rifle or shotgun promoted stem decay and subsequent use by cavity-nesting birds in the Coast Range in Oregon. Inoculated trees were either live or killed by topping. Topped trees were climbed and severed just below the lowest whorl of live branches. Fungal inoculum was delivered by either a 0.45–70 caliber rifle or a 12-gauge shotgun to tree trunks at a height of about 8 m aboveground. Inoculum of either Phellinus pini or Fomitopsis cajanderi was grown on small wooden dowels or sawdust and fitted into the rifle slug (dowels) or behind the shotgun slug (sawdust). Sterile dowels or sawdust were used as a control. After 5 years, all topped trees had died, and at least 50% had sap rot as indicated by the presence of conks of Trichaptum abietinum. Conks of Crytoporus volvatus, Fomitopsis pinicola, or P. pini were sometimes observed on topped (dead) trees. Almost half of the topped trees had evidence of wildlife activity including foraging holes, nest cavities, or bark removal...
Disciplines
Publication Date
July, 2004
Citation Information
Fred A. Baker, Gregory M. Filip, Catherine G. Parks and Stephen E. Daniels. "Technical Note—Artificial Inoculation of Decay Fungi into Douglas-Fir with Rifle or Shotgun to Produce Wildlife Trees in Western Oregon" Western Journal of Applied Forestry Vol. 19 Iss. 3 (2004)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fred_baker/22/