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Article
The politics of gaming in schools: a sociocultural perspective from Western Australia
Learning, Media and Technology (2014)
  • Frank Bate, The University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Dr Jean MacNish, The University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Steven Males, The University of Notre Dame Australia
Abstract
This paper discusses gaming in a Western Australian school for boys. The overriding ethos of the school is supportive of the potential of ICT to better engage students and deliver enhanced educational outcomes. The school sees game-based design as at the vanguard of innovation, but also accepts its important duty of care responsibilities. Tensions were revealed between the opportunities presented by educational gaming and the perceived problem of managing student distraction, particularly the tendency for students to spend large amounts of time playing games that have little or no educational value. The paper describes the forms of gaming that emerged at the school, considering both their educational impact and propensity to detract from students' opportunities to learn. It is argued that the perceived benefits and risks of gaming are not well understood, and that powerful political forces are at play which shape school policy, teachers' pedagogy, parent perceptions and student actions.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2014
DOI
10.1080/17439884.2013.872655
Citation Information
Bate, F., MacNish, J., and Males, S. (2014). The politics of gaming in schools: a sociocultural perspective from Western Australia. Learning, Media and Technology, 39(3), 306-327. DOI: 10.1080/17439884.2013.872655