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Article
Can hopelessness and adolescents’ beliefs and attitudes about seeking help account for help negation?
Journal of Clinical Psychology (2005)
  • Coralie J Wilson, University of Wollongong
Abstract

Avoidance of appropriate help is common in acutely suicidal samples and has been confirmed in nonclinical samples but factors that contribute to this help negation effect remain unclear. The current study is the second in series from the first author's larger PhD research program. In a sample of 269 nonclinical Australian high school students, the current study examines the impact of hopelessness, previous mental health care, beliefs, and attitudes toward professional psychological help on the help negation relationship. Results revealed that suicidal ideation significantly predicted lower help seeking intentions and that although hopelessness could not explain the help negation effect, it moderated the effect for seeking help from family. They also revealed that although previous mental health care was unable to explain the effect fully for professional mental health sources, beliefs and attitudes about professional psychological help could. Implications of the findings for prevention, primary health care, and professional psychological practice are discussed.

Keywords
  • adolescents,
  • suicide prevention,
  • help-seeking,
  • help-negation
Publication Date
2005
Publisher Statement
Wilson, C. J., Deane, F. P., & Ciarrochi, J. (2005). Can hopelessness and adolescents’ beliefs and attitudes about seeking help account for help negation? Journal of Clinical Psychology, 61(12), 1525-1539.
Citation Information
Coralie J Wilson. "Can hopelessness and adolescents’ beliefs and attitudes about seeking help account for help negation?" Journal of Clinical Psychology Vol. 61 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/fdeane/160/