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Article
Uran in Phosphaten. Herkunft und industrielle Gewinnung
Österreichische Chemiker-Zeitung (1970)
  • Fathi Habashi
Abstract
Phosphate rock is the major source of phosphorus in nature. It exists mainly in the form of hydroxy and fluorapatite or a mixture of both. About 100 million tons of rock are treated annually mainly for the production of fertilizers and a minor amount is used in the detergent and food industries. Phosphate rock is of two types: Sedimentary, this represents about 90% of the world reserves and is characterized by containing about 100 ppm uranium and minor amounts of rare earths. An example of this type is in Florida, North Africa, and the Middle East. Igneous, this represents the remaining 10% the world reserves and is characterized by containing about 1 to 2% rare earths and negligible amounts of uranium. An example of this type is in the Kola Peninsula and in Brazil. Methods for the recovery of uranium from these sources are outlined.
Keywords
  • Uranium,
  • Phosphate rock,
  • Solvent extraction,
  • Precipitation
Disciplines
Publication Date
October, 1970
Citation Information
Österreichische Chemiker-Zeitung 60.10 (1959): 284-287