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Contribution to Book
Networked Social Journalism: Media Citizen Participation and Democracy in Nigeria
Participatory Politics and Citizen Journalism in a Networked Africa: A Connected Continent (2016)
  • Farooq A Kperogi
Abstract
In this chapter, I explore the history of Nigeria’s traditional media’s struggles for democracy and inclusion, and show how emergent genres of web-based journalism are supervening upon the traditional media as the sites for the push and pull of democratic discourses. I then deploy case study research to investigate how Nigerian citizens in social media networks such as Facebook and Twitter not only invigorate deliberative democracy, and even democracy itself, by serving as alternative sources of news for Nigerians but for setting the news agenda of the domestic mass media. The chapter also highlights the declining social and cultural capital of the Nigerian legacy media, and shows that the profusion of citizen participation in the democratic project through social media networks isn’t always benevolent. It then suggests ways the legacy media can complement, coopt, or contain the luxuriance and exuberance of the social media scene.
Keywords
  • Social newworks,
  • journalism,
  • citizen media,
  • Nigeria,
  • Online journalism,
  • Networked journalism
Publication Date
Spring 2016
Editor
Bruce Mutsvairo
Publisher
Palgrave Mcmillan
ISBN
978-1-137-55449-9
Citation Information
Farooq A Kperogi. "Networked Social Journalism: Media Citizen Participation and Democracy in Nigeria" Hampshire, UKParticipatory Politics and Citizen Journalism in a Networked Africa: A Connected Continent (2016) p. 19 - 33
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/farooq_kperogi/11/